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Legislation In The States Designed To Limit Union Influence

While Wisconsin has garnered the most headlines for the public sector union fight because of the protests and national speakers who have visited the Badger state, it is certainly not the only state where lawmakers are looking to rein in unions.

In Indiana, Democrats have caught the fleeing fever from fellow Democrats in Wisconsin over labor bills they don’t like and don’t have the ability to stop in the legislature. But, proposed right-to-work legislation is dead in the Hoosier state; although that’s apparently not enough for the Democrats.

In Ohio, legislators are looking at a bill that would end collective bargaining for state workers and end binding arbitration. Ohio has seen union protests similar to those in Wisconsin.

In Michigan, legislation has been proposed that would give “state-appointed emergency financial managers for struggling cities and schools the power to terminate labor union contracts.” Other legislation would eliminate binding arbitration. Unions promise to fight all this legislation.

In Tennessee, the state Senate has taken the first steps to abolishing collective bargaining between teachers unions and school boards throughout the state. Unions aren’t going out with a fight, and have a larger rally planned for March 5.

In South Carolina, lawmakers are looking into legislation known as the “employer free speech act,” which would exempt state businesses from a proposed NLRB rule requiring all businesses to inform workers of their right to unionize.

In Idaho, two bills are headed to the governor’s desk aimed at curbing union influence. The first bill prohibits project labor agreements, while the second forbids unions from using dues to subsidize wages to help union contractors win project bids.

In Oklahoma, a House committee has passed legislation which would repeal collective bargaining rights for municipal employees in the state’s 13 largest cities. Currently, cities with a population of more than 35,000 are required to collectively bargaining with public workers.